Preheader
Injured Worker Employers
subheader

 


Employee Education - Compensation

 

Educación al Empleado - Compensación

   

Temporary Disability


1. Q. What are temporary disability benefits?

A. Temporary disability (TD) benefits are payments you get if you lose wages because your injury prevents you from doing your usual job while recovering. See the DWC fact sheet on TD for more information.


2.Q. Are there different types of TD benefits?

A. There are two types of TD benefits. If you cannot work at all while recovering, you receive temporary total disability (TTD) benefits. If you can't work your full schedule while recovering, you receive temporary partial disability benefit (TPD) payments.



3. Q. How much will I receive in TD payments?

A. As a general rule, TD pays two-thirds of the gross (pre-tax) wages you lose while you are recovering from a job injury. However, you cannot receive more than the maximum weekly amount set by law. Your wages are figured out by using all forms of income you receive from work: wages, food, lodging, tips, commissions, overtime and bonuses. Wages can also include earnings from work you did at other jobs at the time you were injured. Give proof of these earnings to the claims administrator. The claims administrator will consider all forms of income when calculating your TD benefits. Please see the benefits chart for current benefit rates.

The minimum and maximum rates are adjusted annually.



4. Q. What about TTD payments for low-wage workers?

A. Any employee with earnings is entitled to TTD benefits. TTD payments will be paid at two-thirds the injured worker's wages at time of injury. There are minimum and maximum rates for these benefits. Please consult the benefits chart for current rates.

The minimum TTD will continue to be re-calculated each Jan. 1 based on changes to the statewide average weekly wage (SAWW).


5. Q. When does TD start and stop?

A. TD payments begin when your doctor says you can't do your usual work for more than three days or you get hospitalized overnight. Payments must be made every two weeks. Generally, TD stops when you return to work, or when the doctor releases you for work, or says your injury has improved as much as it's going to. If you were injured after Apr. 19, 2004, your TD payments won't last more than 104 weeks within a period of 2 years from the first payment for most injuries. If you were injured after Jan. 1, 2008, your TD payments won't last more than 104 weeks within a period of 5 years from the date of your injury. Payments for a few long-term injuries such as severe burns or chronic lung disease can go longer than 104 weeks. TD payments for these injuries can continue for up to 240 weeks of payment within a five-year period.



6. Q. Are TD benefits taxable?

A. No. You don't pay federal, state or local income tax on TD benefits. Also you don't pay Social Security, taxes, union dues or retirement fund contributions.


7. Q. Can my first temporary disability payment be delayed?

A. Sometimes. If the claims administrator can't determine whether your injury is covered by workers' compensation, he or she may delay your first TD payment while investigating. A delay is usually not longer than 90 days. If there is a delay, the claims administrator must send you a delay letter. It must explain why you won't receive payments, what additional information the claim administrator needs and when a decision will be made. If there are further delays, the claims administrator must send you additional delay letters.

If the claims administrator doesn't send you a letter denying your claim within 90 days after you filed the claim form, your claim is considered accepted in most cases.



8. Q. Is the claims administrator required to pay a penalty for delays in temporary disability payments?

A. It depends. If you had filed the workers' compensation claim form at least 14 days before the payment was due and the claims administrator sends a payment late, he or she must pay you an additional 10 percent of the payment on a self-assessed basis.

9. Q. Why am I receiving so many letters?

A. The claims administrator must keep you up to date by sending letters that explain how payments were determined, why TD will be delayed, reasons for changing TD payment amounts and why the TD benefits are ending.

10. Q. My temporary disability payments stopped without explanation. What should I do?

A. Talk to your employer or claims administrator. If that doesn't help, contact your local DWC I&A officer.

Find more information on TD in the factsheet 

Permanent Disability


1. Q. What are permanent disability benefits?

A. Most workers fully recover from job injuries but some continue to have medical problems. Permanent disability (PD) is any lasting disability that results in a reduced earning capacity after maximum medical improvement is reached. If your injury or illness results in PD you are entitled to PD benefits, even if you are able to go back to work.

PD benefits are limited. If you lose income, PD benefits may not cover all the income lost. If you experience losses unrelated to your ability to work, PD benefits may not cover those losses. See the DWC fact sheet on PD for more information.





2. Q. How is PD identified?

A. A doctor determines if your injury or illness caused PD. After your doctor decides your injury or illness has stabilized and no change is likely, PD is evaluated. At that time, your condition has become permanent and stationary (P&S). Your doctor might use the term maximal medical improvement (MMI) instead of P&S.

Once you are P&S or have reached MMI, your doctor will send a report to the claims administrator telling them you have PD. The doctor also determines if any of your disability was caused by something other than your work injury. For example, a previous injury or other condition. Assigning a percentage of your disability to factors other than your work injury is called apportionment.




3. Q. What happens to the doctor's report?

A. If you were evaluated by a QME, the QME's report is sent to the claims administrator and to the DWC's Disability Evaluation Unit (DEU). A rater from the DEU will use the QME's report and the Employee Disability

Questionnaire that you filled out and gave to the QME at the time of your appointment to calculate your PD rating. If you have an attorney, the rating can be done by either the DEU or a private rater.

You or the claims administrator also has the right to have the report of your primary treating physician (PTP) rated, but this does not happen automatically. You must request a rating of the PTP's report by completing a Request for Summary Rating Determination of Primary Treating Physician's Report and sending it to the DEU with a copy of the PTP's report.

The process used to calculate your rating can vary, depending on your date of injury or other factors. The PD rating is used in a formula that determines the benefits you'll receive.

You have a right to receive a copy of the QME's report as well as the reports from your PTP. Read the QME's and PTP's reports carefully. Make sure they are complete and do not leave out important information. If you believe there are factual errors in the QME's comprehensive report, you can request a factual correction of the report, but you must do so within 30 day of receipt of the report.

The QME will review the request and will issue a supplemental report indicating whether factual correction is necessary to ensure accuracy of the report and how any changes affect the QME's opinions.

4. Q. What if I don't agree with the doctor?

A. If you or the claims administrator disagrees with your doctor's findings you can be seen by a doctor called a QME. You request a QME list (called a panel) from the DWC Medical Unit. The claims administrator will send you the forms to request a QME. Your employer will pay for the cost of the QME exam. You have 10 days from the date the claims administrator tells you to begin the QME process to submit your request form to the DWC Medical Unit. If you do not submit the form within 10 days, the claims administrator will do it for you and will get to choose the kind of doctor you'll see.

There are other specific and strict timelines you must meet in filing your QME forms or you will lose important rights. Read DWC Information and Assistance Unit guide 2 for more information.

When you receive the list of QMEs from the DWC Medical Unit you have to select a doctor, set up an exam and tell the claims administrator about your appointment. If you do not make the appointment within 10 days, the claims administrator may pick the doctor and make the appointment for you.

If you have an attorney, he or she can help you pick a QME or you can be evaluated by AME. An AME is the doctor your attorney and the claims administrator agree on to do your medical examination. In this case you should discuss your options with your attorney.


5. Q. Can I get more detail about the PD rating and how it is calculated?

A. After your examination the doctor will write a medical report about your impairment. Impairment means how your injury affects your ability to do normal life activities. The report includes whether any portion of your disability was caused by something other than your work injury. The doctor's report ends with an impairment number.

Next, the impairment number is put into a formula to calculate your percentage of disability. Disability means how the impairment affects your ability to work. Your occupation and age at the time of your injury and your future earning capacity are all also included in the calculation.

Then, any portion of your disability caused by something other than your work injury is taken out of the calculation.

Your disability will then be stated as a percentage. Your percentage of disability equals a specific dollar amount, depending on the date of your injury and your average weekly wages at the time of injury. A rating specialist from the DWC DEU Unit may help calculate your rating.

If you were injured between Jan. 1, 2005 and Dec. 31, 2012 your PD award may be increased or decreased by 15 percent, depending on whether you work for an employer with 50 or more employees and your employer offers regular, alternative or modified work.




6. Q. I don't agree with the rating by the state disability rater. What can I do?

A. If you don't have an attorney, you can ask the state DWC to review the rating. The DWC will determine if mistakes were made in the medical evaluation process or the rating process. This is called reconsideration of your rating. See I&A guide 3 for more information. You can also present your case to a workers' compensation administrative law judge. Contact a state I&A officer for help. Workers with attorneys cannot request reconsideration. If you have an attorney, he or she can present your case to a judge.



7. Q: How much will I be paid for my permanent disability?

A. PD benefits are set by law. The claims administrator will determine how much to pay you based on three factors:

  • Your disability rating (expressed as a percentage)
  • Date of injury
  • Your wages before you were injured

8. Q. How and when are PD benefits paid?

A. PD benefits are normally paid when TD benefits end and your doctor indicates you have some permanent effects from your injury. The claims administrator must begin paying your PD payments within 14 days after TD ends. The claims administrator picks which day to pay you and will continue to make payments every two weeks until a reasonable estimate of your disability amount has been paid.

If you have not missed any work, PD payments are due when the claims administrator learns the injury has caused a permanent disability.


9. Q. Why am I receiving so many notice letters?

A. By law, the claims administrator must keep you up to date by sending letters that explain how PD payment amounts were determined, when you will receive PD payments, why PD payments will be delayed and why PD benefits won't be paid.


10. Q. Is the claims administrator required to pay a penalty for delays in PD payments?

A. Yes. If the claims administrator sends a payment late, he or she must pay you an additional 10 percent on a self-assessed basis. This is true even if there was a reasonable excuse for the delay and even if the claims administrator sends a letter explaining the delay. You could be awarded a substantial extra payment if there was no reasonable excuse for the delay.

11. Q. How is my claim finally resolved?

A. After the amount of PD in a claim is determined, there is usually a settlement or award for benefits. This award must be approved by a workers' compensation administrative law judge. If you have an attorney, your attorney should help you obtain this award. If you don't have an attorney, the claims administrator should help you obtain the award. You can also get help from the I&A officer at the local DWC district office. If your doctor said further medical treatment for your injury or illness might be necessary, the award may provide future medical care.

You can resolve your whole claim through one lump sum settlement called a C&R . A C&R may be best when you want to control your own medical care and/or you want a lump sum payment for your permanent disability. A C&R usually means that after you get the lump sum payment approved by the workers' compensation judge, the claims administrator will not be liable for any further payments or medical care.

You can also agree to a settlement called a stip or stipulation. A stip usually includes a sum of money and future medical treatment. Payments take place over time. A judge will review the agreement.

If you cannot agree to a settlement with the claims administrator, you can go before a workers' compensation administrative law judge, who will decide your permanent disability award. A judge's finding is called a F&A. The F&A generally consists of a sum of money and a provision for the claims administrator to pay for approved future medical treatment.

If you agree to a stip or receive an F&A, the amount of your PD benefit will be spread over a fixed number of weeks. If you C&R your case you get a lump sum payment. If you have PTD, you are eligible to receive payments for the rest of your life.

In all of these situations your PD payments will likely begin before the final decision about the amount of your PD is reached. That's because, once your doctor says you have permanent disability, the claims administrator will estimate how much you should receive and begin making payments to you before the final percentage of disability has been calculated.

When the actual amount of PD due has been determined, the amount due over the original estimate will be paid.

Find more information about permanent disability in the factsheet.







Returning to Work


1. Q: I really just want to get back to work. How can I make that happen?

A. Injured workers who return to the job as soon as medically possible have the best outcomes. They recover from their injuries faster and suffer less wage loss. Your decision about returning to work will be influenced by your doctor, your employer and the claims administrator. Communicate honestly and frequently with them for the best results.

If your doctor decides you cannot return to work while recovering from your injuries you cannot be required to go back to your job.

Sometimes you can go back to your job with work restrictions if your employer is willing and able to make accommodations. For example, your employer may change certain parts of your job or provide you with new equipment.

If your doctor says you can go back to work with restrictions but your employer is unwilling or unable to accommodate your injuries, you are not required to return to work. Meanwhile, depending on your injuries, you may be eligible for TD, supplemental job displacement benefits or PD benefits.




2. Q. How is my ability to return to work determined?

A. Returning to work safely and promptly can help in your recovery. It can also help you avoid financial losses from being off work. After you are hurt on the job, several people will work with you to decide when you will return to work and what work you will do. These people include:

  • Your treating doctor
  • Managers who represent your employer
  • The claims administrator handling your claim for your employer

Sometimes doctors and claims administrators do not fully understand your job or other jobs that could be assigned to you. That's why it is important that everyone stay in close contact throughout the process. You (and your attorney if you have one) should actively communicate with your treating doctor, your employer and the claims administrator about:

  • The work you did before you were injured
  • Your medical condition and the kinds of work you can do now
  • The kinds of work your employer could make available to you

3. Q. Can I work while I am recovering?

A. Soon after your injury, the treating doctor examines you and sends a report to the claims administrator about your medical condition. If the treating doctor says you are able to work, he or she should describe:

  • Clear and specific limits, if any, on your job tasks while recovering. These are called work restrictions. They are intended to protect you from further injury (example: no work that requires repetitive bending or stooping)
  • Changes needed, if any, in your schedule, assignments, equipment or other working conditions while recovering (example: provide headset to avoid awkward positions of the head and neck)
  • If the treating doctor reports that you cannot work at all while recovering you cannot be required to work

4. Q. I have work restrictions. Can I work?

A. If your treating doctor reports that you can return to work under specific work restrictions, any work your employer assigns must meet these restrictions. Your employer might, for example, change certain tasks or provide helpful equipment. Or your employer may say that work like this is not available. If so, you cannot be required to work.

5. Q. What if I have no work restrictions?

A. If your treating doctor reports that you can return to your job without restrictions, your employer usually must give you the same job and pay you had before you were injured. The employer can require you to take the job. This could happen soon after the injury, or it could happen much later, after your condition has improved.


6. Q. What if my employer offers me work?

A. If the claims administrator's letter says your employer is offering you work, the job must meet the work restrictions in the doctor's report. The offer could involve:

  • Regular work: Your old job, for a period of at least 12 months, paying the same wages and benefits as paid at the time of an injury and located within a reasonable commuting distance of where you lived at the time of your injury
  • Modified work: Your old job, with some changes that allow you do to it. If your doctor says you will not be able to return to the job you had at the time of injury, your employer is encouraged to offer you modified work instead of supplemental job displacement benefits (SJDB). The alternative work must meet your work restrictions, last at least 12 months, pay at least 85 percent of the wages and benefits you were paid at the time you were injured and be within a reasonable commuting distance of where you lived at the time of injury
  • Alternative work: A new job with your employer. If your doctor says you will not be able to return to the job you had at the time of injury, your employer is encouraged to offer you alternative work instead of SJDB. The alternative work must meet your work restrictions, last at least 12 months, pay at least 85 percent of the wages and benefits you were paid at the time you were injured, and be within a reasonable commuting distance of where you lived at the time of injury

If your employer offers you modified or alternative work:

  • You may have only 30 days to accept the offer. If you don't respond within 30 days, your employer could withdraw the offer
  • If you fail to respond to the offer of modified or alternative work within 30 days or reject the job offer, you will probably not be entitled to supplemental job displacement benefits







7. Q. What if my employer does not offer me work?

A. If you were injured between Jan. 1, 2004 and Dec. 31, 2012, and your employer has 50 or more workers, and you are not offered regular, modified or alternative work, your weekly PD benefits will be increased by 15 percent once that offer is made.

If you were injured between Jan. 1, 2004 and Dec. 31, 2012, and your employer has fewer than 50 workers, and you are not offered regular, modified or alternative work, your PD benefits will not change.

If you were injured on or after Jan. 1, 2013, your permanent disability benefits will not change if you are not offered regular, modified or alternative work, regardless of the size of the employer.


8. Q. Why are my PD disability benefits affected by the return to work offer?

A. The state's experience and extensive studies have shown that the longer you stay off work the less likely you are to go back, and that leads to more wage loss and a lower quality of life. PD benefits will never make up for the money you lose by not returning to work, so these provisions were put in place to get you back to your job as soon as medically possible.

Of course, for some people this just may not be possible. Consult an I&A officer or an advocate of your choice if your situation is complex or you need to figure out what other resources are available to you.


9. Q. What if the job my employer offered does not work out?

A. Depending on your date of injury, you may still be entitled SJDB if the job does not last for 12 months or your disability prevents you from performing the tasks involved in the job. If you have concerns, talk to your employer or the claims administrator. If that doesn't help, call a state I&A officer.

10. Q. How do I qualify for SJDB?

A. If you were injured on or after Jan. 1, 2004, and are permanently unable to do your usual job, and your employer does not offer other work, you may qualify for SJDB. This benefit is in the form of a voucher that helps pay for educational retraining or skill enhancement -- or both -- at state-approved or state-accredited schools.

For date of injury on or after Jan. 1, 2004 and prior to Jan. 1, 2013, employees who do not return to work for their employer within 60 days of the end of TD payments will receive a voucher. The amount of the voucher is based on the percentage of disability:

  • Up to $4,000 voucher for permanent partial disability of less than 15 percent
  • Up to $6,000 voucher for permanent partial disability between 15 and 25 percent
  • Up to $8,000 voucher for permanent partial disability between 26 and 49 percent
  • Up to $10,000 voucher for permanent partial disability between 50 and 99 percent

Up to 10 percent of the voucher funds may be used for vocational or return-to-work counseling.

The law also says that an employer will not be liable for providing the SJDB to an employee if, within 30 days of the end of TD payments, an offer of modified or alternative work is made, and the employee rejects or fails to accept the offer in the form and manner prescribed by the DWC administrative director.

For injuries occurring on or after Jan. 1, 2013, the voucher amount is $6,000.00 regardless of the PD rating. The voucher will be due 60 days after a treating doctor, QME, or AME declares the employee permanent and stationary and issues a report outlining the employee's work capacities if the employer does not offer the employee a job. The job must pay no less than 85% of the employee's earnings at the time of injury and must be expected to last at least 12 months.





11. Q. What if my employer offers a modified or alternative job and I don't accept it? Can I still receive the voucher?

A. No. For injuries occurring between Jan. 1, 2004 and Dec. 31, 2012, if the employer sends a notice of offer of modified or alternative work within 30 days of your last temporary disability (TD) payment and the offer meets certain requirements, and you don't accept the job, you're not eligible for the voucher. The offer of modified or alternative work must meet the following conditions:

  • You have the ability to perform the essential functions of the job
  • The job is a regular position lasting at least 12 months
  • The job offers wages and compensation that are at least 85 percent of those paid to you at the time of your injury
  • The job is located within reasonable commuting distance of your residence at the time of injury

For injuries on or after Jan. 1, 2013, if the employer makes an offer of regular, modified, or alternative work within 60 days after receipt by the claims administrator of the Physician’s Return-to-Work & Voucher Report and the offer meets certain requirements and you don't accept the job, you're not eligible for the voucher. The offer of modified or alternative work must meet the following conditions:

  • You have the ability to perform the essential functions of the job
  • The job is a regular position lasting at least 12 months
  • The job offers wages and compensation that are at least 85 percent of those paid to you at the time of your injury
  • The job is located within reasonable commuting distance of your residence at the time of injury

Job offers should not be filed with DWC.

12. Q. When will I receive the SJDB voucher?

A. For injuries occurring between Jan. 1, 2004 and Dec. 31, 2012, if you are eligible for the voucher and you haven't settled your eligibility (as part of an overall settlement in your case) you will receive the voucher from the claims administrator within 25 calendar days from the date your disability award is issued by the workers' compensation judge at the local Workers' Compensation Appeals Board district office. For injuries occurring on or after Jan. 1, 2013, the voucher is due 60 days after a treating doctor, AME or QME declares the injured worker permanent and stationary, and issues a report outlining the worker’s work capacities, if the employer does not offer the worker a job.

13. Q: When can I expect to receive the payments specified in the voucher?

A. The claims administrator must issue reimbursement payments to you or direct payments to the VRTWC and training provider within 45 calendar days from receipt of the completed voucher, receipts and documentation.


14. Q. I disagree with my treating doctor's opinion about the work I can handle. What can I do?

A. Different doctors may have different opinions about a worker's ability to do tasks safely. You have a right to question or disagree with a report written by your treating doctor. To dispute the doctor's report about your ability to work:

  • If you do not have an attorney, you must send a letter to the claims administrator stating that you disagree with the report. You must send the letter within 30 days of receiving the report
  • If you have an attorney, contact your attorney right away. The deadline for stating your disagreement is 20 days
  • Next, you can get a medical evaluation from another doctor. For information about medical evaluations, call the DWC Medical Unit at 1-800-794-6900

For help in getting a medical evaluation, contact a DWC I&A officer.



             
15. Q. I don't agree with my employer about work assigned or offered to me. What can I do?

A. If your employer assigns or offers you work that does not meet the work restrictions required by your treating doctor, you don't have to accept it. Contact a DWC I&A officer for more details on how to proceed.

It is illegal for an employer to discriminate against you because you requested workers' compensation benefits or because you have a work-related disability. This is prohibited by California Labor Code section 132a, the federal Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the California Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA).

However, an employer is not always required to offer you a job or offer a job that you may want. For example, there may not be any jobs you can do that meet the doctor's work restrictions.





16. Q. What if I don't have any PD (a zero rating) but I still can't return to work?

A. There is nothing more the DWC can do for you at that point, but other types of assistance may be available:

  • State disability insurance (SDI) or, in rare cases, unemployment insurance (UI) benefits paid by the state Employment Development Department (EDD)
  • Social Security disability benefits paid by the U.S. government for total disability
  • Benefits offered by employers and unions, such as sick leave, group health insurance, long term disability insurance (LTD) and salary continuation plans
  • A claim or lawsuit if your injury was caused by someone other than your employer

You should also be aware that the federal Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) prohibits discriminating against those with physical or mental impairments that substantially limit one or more life activities, and who can perform essential job functions. An employer is required to provide a reasonable accommodation if it would not impose an "undue hardship" on them.

For information on the ADA, call the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission at 1-800-USA-EEOC.

Additionally, the state Department of Fair Employment and Housing administers the California Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA), which prohibits harassment or discrimination in employment, housing and public accommodations. For more information on FEHA call 1-800-884-1684.






17. Q. Can the voucher be settled for a cash payment?

A. Not for injuries on or after Jan. 1, 2013.

18. Q. Does a voucher expire?

A. The voucher does not expire if issued prior to Jan. 1, 2013. If issued on or after Jan. 1, 2013, the voucher will expire within two years of being issued or five years from the date of injury, whichever comes later.



Mileage Rates


An injured worker is entitled to reimbursement of reasonable expenses of transportation if they have to travel to get treatment for a work injury. Reasonable expenses of transportation includes mileage, parking, and bridge tolls. Mileage for reasonable travel to and from doctors, hospitals, therapy or pharmacy is payable as follows:

Date ¢ per Mile Mileage Form
On or after 1/1/2014   $.56   Download
On or after 1/1/2013   $.565   Download
On or after 7/1/2011   $.555   Download
1/1/2011 - 7/1/2011   $0.51   Download
1/1/2010 - 12/31/2010   $0.50   Download
1/1/2009 - 12/31/2009   $0.55   Download
7/1/2008 - 12/31/2008   $0.485   Download
1/1/2008 - 6/30/2008   $0.505   Download
1/1/2007 - 12/31/2007   $0.485   Download
7/1/2006 - 1/1/2007   $0.445   Download

Los Beneficios de Incapacidad Temporal


1. P. ¿Cuáles son los beneficios de incapacidad temporal?

R. Los beneficios de incapacidad temporal (Temporary disability- TD) son pagos que recibe si pierde sueldos porque su lesión le impide hacer su trabajo usual mientras se está recuperando. Consulte la hoja de información sobre la TD de la DWC para más información.

2. P. ¿Hay diferentes clases de beneficios de TD?

R. Hay dos clases de beneficios de TD. Si usted no puede trabajar en absoluto mientras se recupera, recibe beneficios de incapacidad temporal total (Temporary Total Disability- TTD). Si no puede trabajar su horario completo mientras se recupera, recibe pagos del beneficio de incapacidad temporal parcial (Temporary Partial Disability- TPD).

3. P. ¿Cuánto voy a recibir en pagos de TD?

R. Como regla general, TD paga dos tercios (2/3) del salario bruto (antes de deducciones e impuestos) que usted pierde mientras se está recuperando de una lesión laboral. Sin embargo, usted no puede recibir más de la cantidad máxima semanal establecida por ley. Sus salarios se calculan usando toda clase de ingresos que usted recibe por trabajar: sueldos, comida, alojamiento, propinas, comisiones, horas extras trabajadas y bonificaciones. Los salarios también pueden incluir ingresos de otros trabajos que usted hacía al tiempo que usted se lesionó. Proporcione pruebas de estos ingresos al administrador de reclamos. El administrador de reclamos considerará toda forma de ingresos al calcular sus beneficios deTD. Por favor consulte la tabla de beneficios para las tasas de beneficios actuales.

Las tasas mínimas y máximas se ajustan anualmente.

4. P. ¿Qué tal los pagos de TTD para trabajadores de bajos ingresos?

R. Cualquier empleado con ingresos tiene derecho a beneficios de TTD. Los pagos de TTD serán pagados a dos tercios del salario del trabajador lesionado al momento de la lesión. Hay tasas mínimas y máximas para estos beneficios. Por favor consulte la tabla de beneficios para las tasas actuales.

El mínimo de TTD seguirá siendo recalculado cada 1 de enero basado en cambios al promedio salario semanal estatal (Statewide Average Weekly Wage- SAWW).

5. P. ¿Cuándo comienza y termina la TD?

R. Los pagos de TD empiezan cuando su médico indica que no puede hacer su trabajo usual por más de tres días o está hospitalizado por una noche. Los pagos deben hacerse cada dos semanas. Generalmente, la TD termina cuando usted regresa a trabajar o cuando el médico le permite regresar a trabajar o indica que su lesión ha mejorado lo mejor posible. Si usted se lesionó después del 19 de abril, 2004, sus pagos de TD no durarán más de 104 semanas dentro de un período de 2 años a partir del primer pago para la mayoría de las lesiones. Si usted se lesionó después del 1 de enero, 2008, sus pagos de TD no durarán más de 104 semanas dentro de un período de 5 años a partir de la fecha de su lesión. Los pagos para algunas lesiones de largo plazo como quemaduras severas o enfermedad pulmonar crónica pueden pagarse por más de las 104 semanas. Los pagos deTD para estas lesiones continuarán hasta 240 semanas dentro de un período de cinco años.

6. P. ¿Son imponibles los beneficios de TD?

R. No. Usted no paga impuestos federales, estatales o locales sobre los beneficios de TD. Tampoco paga el Seguro Social, impuestos, cuotas sindicales o contribuciones a los fondos de jubilación.

7. P. ¿Puede ser demorado mi primer pago de incapacidad temporal?

R. A veces. Si el administrador de reclamos no puede determinar si su lesión está cubierta por la compensación de trabajadores, él o ella pueden demorar su primer pago de TD mientras investigan. Una demora generalmente no tarda más que 90 días. Si hay una demora, el administrador de reclamos debe enviarle una carta de demora. Debe explicar por qué usted no recibirá pagos, qué información adicionalnecesita el administrador de reclamos y cuándo se tomará una decisión. Si hay aún más demoras, el administrador de reclamos debe enviarle cartas de demora adicionales.

Si el administrador de reclamos no le envía una carta negando su reclamo dentro de los 90 días después de que usted presentó el formulario de reclamo, su reclamo se considerará aceptado en la mayoría de los casos.

8. P. ¿Se le exige al administrador de reclamos pagar multas por demoras en los pagos de incapacidad temporal?

R. Eso depende. Si usted había presentado un formulario de reclamo por lo menos 14 días antes del pago debido y el administrador de reclamos envía un pago tarde, él o ella deben pagarle el 10 por ciento adicional del pago en una base autoevaluada.

9. P. ¿Por qué estoy recibiendo tantas cartas?

R. El administrador de reclamos debe mantenerlo informado enviándole cartas que explican cómo se determinaron los pagos, por qué se demorará la TD, razones por cambiar cantidades de pago de TD y por qué se terminan los beneficios de TD.

10. P. Mis pagos de incapacidad temporal terminaron sin explicación. ¿Qué debo hacer?

R. Hable con su empleador o administrador de reclamos. Si eso no ayuda, póngase en contacto con su Oficial de I&A de la DWC local.

Encuentre más información sobre la TD en la hoja de información.


Los Beneficios de Incapacidad Permanente


1. P. ¿Qué son beneficios de incapacidad permanente (Permanent Disability- PD)?

R. La mayoría de los trabajadores se recuperan completamente de lesiones laborales pero algunos continúan teniendo problemas médicos. Incapacidad permanente (Permanent Disability- PD) es cualquier incapacidad duradera que resulta en una reducida capacidad de ganarse la vida después de llegar al máximo mejoramiento médico. Si su lesión o enfermedad resulta en una PD usted tendrá derecho a beneficios de PD, aún si puede regresar a trabajar.

Los beneficios de PD son limitados. Si usted pierde ingresos, es posible que los beneficios de PD no cubran todos los ingresos perdidos. Si usted tiene pérdidas no relacionadas con su capacidad de trabajar, puede ser que los beneficios de PD no cubran esas pérdidas. Consulte la hoja de información sobre la PD de la DWC para más información.

2. P. ¿Cómo se identifica la PD?

R. Un médico determina si su lesión o enfermedad causa PD. Después de que su médico decide que su lesión o enfermedad se ha estabilizado y no es probable que cambie, se evalúa la PD. En ese momento, su condición se ha convertido a permanente y estacionaria (Permanent & Stationary- P&S). Su médico podría usar el término máximo mejoramiento médico (Maximal Medical Improvement- MMI) en lugar de P&S.

Una vez que usted esté P&S o haya alcanzado el MMI, su médico enviará un informe al administrador de reclamos diciéndoles que usted tiene PD. El médico también determina si alguna parte de su incapacidad fue causada por algo que no sea su lesión de trabajo. Por ejemplo, una lesión previa u otra condición. La asignación de un porcentaje de su incapacidad a factores que no sean de su lesión de trabajo se llama prorrateo.

3. P. ¿Qué sucede con el informe del médico?

R. Si usted fue evaluado por un QME, el informe del QME se envía al administrador de reclamos y a la Unidad de Evaluación de Incapacidades (Disability Evaluation Unit- DEU) de la DWC. Un evaluador de la DEU utilizará el informe del QME y el Cuestionario de Incapacidad del Empleado que usted llenó y le dio al QME en el momento de su cita para calcular su clasificación de PD. Si usted tiene un abogado, la clasificación puede hacerse por la DEU o un evaluador privado.

Usted o el administrador de reclamos también tienen derecho a que el informe de su médico primario (Primary Treating Physician-PTP) sea clasificado, pero esto no sucede automáticamente. Usted debe solicitar una clasificación del informe del PTP llenando una Solicitud para Determinación de la Clasificación Sumaria del Informe del Médico Primario y enviarla a la DEU con una copia del informe del PTP.

El proceso utilizado para calcular su clasificación puede variar dependiendo de su fecha de lesión o de otros factores. La clasificación de PD se utiliza en una fórmula que determina los beneficios que recibirá.

Usted tiene derecho a recibir una copia del informe del QME, así como los informes del PTP. Lea los informes del PTP y QME cuidadosamente. Asegúrese de que estén completos y no omitan información importante. Si usted cree que hay errores en el informe detallado del QME, puede solicitar una corrección factual del informe, pero debe hacerlo dentro de 30 días de recibirlo.

El QME revisará la solicitud y emitirá un informe suplementario indicando si la corrección fáctica es necesaria para asegurar la exactitud del informe y cómo los cambios afectan las opiniones del QME.


4. P. ¿Qué tal si no estoy de acuerdo con el médico?

R. Si usted o el administrador de reclamos no está de acuerdo con las conclusiones de su médico puede ser evaluado por un médico llamado un QME. Usted solicita la lista de QMEs (llamada un panel) de la Unidad Médica de la DWC. El administrador de reclamos le enviará el formulario para solicitar un QME. Su empleador pagará por el costo del examen con el QME. Usted tiene 10 días a partir de la fecha en que el administrador de reclamos le indique que comience el proceso del QME para enviar su formulario de solicitud a la Unidad Médica de la DWC. Si no envía el formulario dentro de 10 días, el administrador de reclamos lo hará por usted y podrá escoger el tipo de médico que verá.

Hay otros plazos estrictos y específicos que debe cumplir en la presentación de sus formularios QME o perderá derechos importantes. Lea la guía 2 de la Unidad de Información y Asistencia de la DWC para más información.

Cuando reciba la lista de QMEs de la Unidad Médica de la DWC debe seleccionar un médico, establecer un examen e informarle al administrador de reclamos acerca de su cita. Si usted no fija la cita dentro de 10 días, el administrador de reclamos puede elegir el médico y fijar la cita para usted.

Si usted tiene un abogado, él o ella puede ayudarle a escoger un QME o puede ser evaluado por un AME. Un AME es el médico que su abogado y el administrador de reclamos acordaron para realizar su examen médico. En este caso usted debe hablar con su abogado sobre sus opciones.

5. P. ¿Puedo obtener más detalles acerca de la clasificación de PD y cómo se calcula?

R. Después de su examen, el médico escribirá un informe médico sobre su discapacidad o deterioro. Discapacidad o deterioro significa cómo su lesión afecta su capacidad para realizar actividades normales de la vida. El informe incluye si cualquier porción de su discapacidad fue causada por algo que no sea su lesión de trabajo. El informe del médico termina con un número de discapacidad o deterioro.

Después, se pone el número de discapacidad o deterioro en una fórmula para calcular el porcentaje de incapacidad. Incapacidad significa cómo el deterioro afecta su capacidad para trabajar. Su ocupación y su edad al momento de la lesión y su capacidad de ganancias futuras están también incluidas en el cálculo.

Entonces, cualquier porción de su incapacidad causada por algo que no sea su lesión de trabajo se saca del cálculo.

Su incapacidad será entonces indicada como un porcentaje. Su porcentaje de incapacidad equivale a una suma específica, dependiendo de la fecha de su lesión y el promedio de su salarió semanal en el momento de la lesión. Un especialista que calcula las clasificaciones en la Unidad de Evaluación de Incapacidades (Disability Evaluation Unit-DEU) de la DWC puede ayudarle a calcular su clasificación.

Si usted se lesionó entre el 1 de enero, 2005 y el 31 de diciembre, 2012 su determinación de PD puede aumentar o declinar por un 15 por ciento, dependiendo si usted trabaja para un empleador con 50 o más trabajadores y si su empleador ofrece trabajo regular, alternativo o modificado.

6. P. No estoy de acuerdo con la clasificación del clasificador de incapacidad estatal. ¿Qué puedo hacer?

R. Si usted no tiene abogado, puede pedirle a la DWC estatal que revise la clasificación. La DWC determinará si se cometieron errores en el proceso de la evaluación médica o en el de la clasificación. Esto se llama la reconsideración de su clasificación. Vea la Guía 3 de I&A para más información. También puede presentar su caso a un juez de leyes administrativas de compensación de trabajadores. Póngase en contacto con un oficial de I&A estatal para asistencia. Los trabajadores con abogados no pueden solicitar la reconsideración. Si usted tiene un abogado, él o ella pueden presentar su caso ante un juez.

7. P. ¿Cuánto me pagarán por mi incapacidad permanente?

R. Los beneficios de PD están establecidos por ley. El administrador de reclamos determinará cuánto pagarle basado en tres factores:

  • Su clasificación de incapacidad (expresado como porcentaje)
  • La fecha de la lesión
  • Su salario antes de lesionarse

8. P. ¿Cómo y cuándo se pagan los beneficios por incapacidad permanente?

R. Los beneficios de PD se pagan normalmente cuando terminan los beneficios de TD y su médico indica que tiene algunos efectos permanentes por su lesión. El administrador de reclamos debe comenzar a pagar sus pagos de incapacidad permanente dentro de 14 días después de que termina la TD. El administrador de reclamos escoge qué día pagarle y seguirá haciendo pagos cada dos semanas hasta que se ha pagado una estimación razonable de su cantidad de incapacidad.

Si usted no ha faltado al trabajo, los pagos de PD se deben cuando el administrador de reclamos se entera que la lesión ha causado una incapacidad permanente.

9. P. ¿Por qué estoy recibiendo tantas cartas de notificación?

R. Por ley, el administrador de reclamos debe mantenerlo al tanto mediante el envío de cartas que explican cómo se determinaron las cantidades de pago de PD, cuando recibirá pagos de PD, por qué se demorarán los pagos de PD y por qué se pagarán los pagos de PD.

10. P. ¿Se le requiere al administrador de reclamos pagar alguna multa por demoras en los pagos de PD?

R. Sí. Si el administrador de reclamos envía un pago tarde, él o ella deben pagar un 10 por ciento adicional en una base autoevaluada. Esto es cierto incluso si había una excusa razonable para la demora e incluso si el administrador de reclamos envía una carta explicando la demora. Podría ser concedido un pago extra considerable si no había una excusa razonable para la demora.

11. P. ¿Cómo se resuelve finalmente mi reclamo?

R. Después que se determina la cantidad de PD en un reclamo, hay generalmente un acuerdo o fallo para finalizar los beneficios. Un juez de leyes administrativas de compensación de trabajadores debe aprobar este acuerdo. Si tiene un abogado, su abogado le debe ayudar a obtener este acuerdo. Si usted no tiene abogado, el administrador de reclamos le debe ayudar a obtener este acuerdo. Usted también puede conseguir ayuda del oficial de I&A en la oficina regional de la DWC local. Si su médico dijo que necesita tratamiento médico adicional para su lesión o enfermedad, el acuerdo le puede proporcionar futuro tratamiento médico.

Usted puede resolver su reclamo entero a través de un acuerdo de pago global llamado un compromiso y liberación o C&R. Un C&R puede ser mejor cuando usted quiere controlar su propio tratamiento médico y/o quiere un pago global por su incapacidad permanente. Un C&R por lo general significa que después de obtener el pago global aprobado por el juez de compensación de trabajadores, el administrador de reclamos no será responsable por pagos adicionales ni tratamiento médico.

También puede aceptar un acuerdo llamado un stip o estipulación. Un stip usualmente incluye una suma de dinero y futuro tratamiento médico. Los pagos se realizan en plazos. Un juez revisará el acuerdo.

Si no puede llegar a un acuerdo con el administrador de reclamos, puede ir frente a un juez de compensación de trabajadores quién puede hacer una determinación sobre la cantidad de incapacidad permanente. La decisión del juez es un fallo (Findings & Award- F&A). El F&A generalmente consiste de una suma de dinero y la estipulación que el administrador de reclamos pague por futuro tratamiento médico aprobado.

Si acepta un stip o recibe un F&A, la cantidad de su beneficio de PD se puede extender sobre un número fijo de semanas. Si usted acepta un C&R en su caso recibe un pago global. Si tiene incapacidad permanente total (Permanent Total Disability- PTD), usted tiene derecho a recibir pagos por el resto de su vida.

En todas estas situaciones los pagos de PD probablemente comenzarán antes de llegar a una decisión final sobre la cantidad de su PD. Eso es porque una vez que su médico dice que usted tiene una incapacidad permanente, el administrador de reclamos estimará la cantidad que debe recibir y comenzará a hacerle pagos antes de que el porcentaje final de la incapacidad se haya calculado.

Cuando se ha determinado la cantidad debida de PD actual, se pagará la cantidad debida sobre la estimación original.

Encuentre más información acerca de la incapacidad permanente en la hoja de información.


El Regreso al Trabajo


1. P. Realmente sólo quiero volver al trabajo. ¿Cómo puedo hacer que eso suceda?

R. Los trabajadores lesionados que regresan al trabajo tan pronto como sea médicamente posible tienen los mejores resultados. Se recuperan de sus lesiones más rápido y sufren menos pérdida de salario. Su decisión de regresar al trabajo será influida por su médico, su empleador y el administrador de reclamos. Comuníquese honestamente y con frecuencia con ellos para los mejores resultados.

Si su médico decide que no puede regresar al trabajo mientras se recupera de sus lesiones no se le puede exigir volver a su trabajo.

A veces se puede volver a su trabajo con restricciones de trabajo si su empleador está dispuesto y puede hacer adaptaciones. Por ejemplo, su empleador puede cambiar ciertas partes de su trabajo o proporcionarle nuevo equipo.

Si su médico le dice que puede volver a trabajar con restricciones, pero su empleador no está dispuesto o no puede hacer adaptaciones, usted no está obligado a regresar al trabajo.

Mientras tanto, dependiendo de sus lesiones, usted puede ser elegible para TD, beneficios suplementarios por la pérdida de trabajo o beneficios de PD.

2. P. ¿Cómo se determina mi capacidad de regresar a trabajar?

R. Regresar a trabajar con seguridad y prontitud puede ayudar en su recuperación. También puede ayudarle a evitar pérdidas financieras por estar fuera del trabajo. Después de lesionarse en el trabajo, varias personas trabajarán con usted para decidir cuándo volverá a trabajar y qué trabajo hará. Estas personas incluyen:

  • Su médico que lo atiende
  • Gerentes que representan a su empleador
  • El administrador de reclamos manejando su reclamo para su empleador

A veces los médicos y los administradores de reclamos no entienden completamente su trabajo u otros puestos de trabajo que le podrían asignar a usted. Por eso es importante que todos se mantengan en contacto durante el proceso. Usted (y su abogado si tiene uno) deben comunicarse activamente con el médico que lo atiende, su empleador y el administrador de reclamos sobre:

  • El trabajo que hacía antes de lesionarse
  • Su estado médico y los tipos de trabajo que puede hacer ahora
  • Los tipos de trabajo que su empleador podría hacer disponible para usted

3. P. ¿Puedo trabajar mientras me estoy recuperando?

R. Poco después de su lesión, el médico que lo está atendiendo lo examina y envía un informe al administrador de reclamos sobre su estado médico. Si el médico que lo atiende dice que usted puede trabajar, él o ella deben describir:

  • Límites claros y específicos, si los hay, en sus tareas de trabajo mientras se recupera. Estos se llaman restricciones de trabajo. Tienen la intención de protegerlo de lesiones adicionales (ejemplo: ningún trabajo que requiere agacharse o inclinarse repetidamente)
  • Cambios necesarios, si los hay, en su horario, tareas, equipo u otras condiciones de trabajo mientras se recupera (ejemplo: proporcionarle auriculares para evitar posiciones incómodas de la cabeza y el cuello)
  • Si el médico que lo atiende informa que usted no puede trabajar en absoluto mientras se recupera no puede ser obligado a trabajar

4. P. Tengo restricciones de trabajo. ¿Puedo trabajar?

R. Si el médico que lo atiende informa que puede regresar a trabajar bajo restricciones especificas de trabajo, cualquier trabajo que su empleador le asigne debe cumplir con estas restricciones. Su empleador podría, por ejemplo, cambiar ciertas tareas o proveer equipos útiles. O su empleador puede decir que trabajo como éste no está disponible. Si es así, usted no puede ser obligado a trabajar.

5. P. ¿Qué si no tengo restricciones de trabajo?

R. Si el médico que lo atiende informa que puede regresar a su trabajo sin restricciones, su empleador por lo general debe darle el mismo trabajo y pagarle lo mismo que antes de lesionarse. El empleador puede requerir que usted acepte el trabajo. Esto podría ocurrir poco después de la lesión, o mucho más tarde, después de que ha mejorado su condición.

6. P. ¿Qué si mi empleador me ofrece trabajo?

R. Si la carta del administrador de reclamos dice que su empleador le está ofreciendo trabajo, el trabajo debe cumplir con las restricciones laborales del informe médico. La oferta podría incluir:

  • Trabajo regular: Su antiguo trabajo, por un período de por lo menos 12 meses, pagando el mismo salario y beneficios pagados en el momento de una lesión y ubicado a una distancia de viaje razonable de donde usted vivía en el momento de su lesión
  • Trabajo modificado: Su antiguo trabajo, con algunos cambios que le permitan hacerlo. Si su médico dice que usted no podrá regresar al trabajo que tenía en el momento de la lesión, se le recomienda a su empleador ofrecerle un trabajo modificado en lugar de los beneficios suplementarios por la pérdida de trabajo (Supplemental Job Displacement Benefits- SJDB). El trabajo alternativo debe cumplir con sus restricciones de trabajo, durar por lo menos 12 meses, pagarle por lo menos el 85 por ciento de los salarios y beneficios pagados en el momento que se lesionó y estar dentro de una distancia de viaje razonable de donde usted vivía en el momento de su lesión.
  • Trabajo alternativo: Un nuevo trabajo con su empleador. Si su médico dice que usted no podrá regresar al trabajo que tenía en el momento de la lesión, se le recomienda a su empleador ofrecerle un trabajo modificado en lugar de los beneficios suplementarios por la pérdida de trabajo. El trabajo alternativo debe cumplir con sus restricciones de trabajo, durar por lo menos 12 meses, pagarle por lo menos el 85 por ciento de los salarios y beneficios pagados en el momento que se lesionó y estar dentro de una distancia de viaje razonable de donde usted vivía en el momento de su lesión

Si su empleador le ofrece trabajo modificado o alternativo:

  • Usted puede tener sólo 30 días para aceptar la oferta. Si usted no responde dentro de 30 días, su empleador podría retirar la oferta
  • Si usted no responde a la oferta de trabajo modificado o alternativo dentro de 30 días o rechaza la oferta de trabajo, probablemente no tendrá derecho a beneficios suplementarios por la pérdida de trabajo

7. P. ¿Qué si mi empleador no me ofrece trabajo?

R. Si usted se lesionó entre el 1 de enero, 2004 y el 31 de diciembre, 2012, y su empleador tiene 50 o más trabajadores, y no le ofrecen trabajo regular, modificado o alternativo, sus beneficios de PD semanales aumentarán un15 por ciento una vez que se haga esa oferta.

Si usted se lesionó entre el 1 de enero, 2004 y el 31 de diciembre, 2012, y su empleador tiene menos de 50 trabajadores, y no le ofrecen trabajo regular, modificado o alternativo, sus beneficios de PD no cambiarán.

Si usted se lesionó en o después del 1 de enero, 2013, sus beneficios de incapacidad permanente no cambiarán si no le ofrecen trabajo regular, modificado o alternativo, sin importar el tamaño del empleador.

8. P. ¿Por qué afecta a mis beneficios de PD mi oferta de regreso al trabajo?

R. La experiencia del estado y amplios estudios han demostrado que entre más tiempo esté fuera del trabajo es menos probable que regrese, y eso conduce a más pérdida de sueldo y una calidad de vida más baja. Los beneficios de PD nunca compensarán el dinero que pierde por no regresar a trabajar, así que estas medidas se implementaron para que usted vuelva a su trabajo tan pronto como sea médicamente posible.

Por supuesto, para algunas personas esto simplemente podría ser imposible. Consulte con un oficial de I&A o un defensor de su elección si su situación es compleja o si necesita averiguar que otros recursos están disponibles para usted.

9. P. ¿Qué si no me va bien en el trabajo que mi empleador me ofreció?

R: Según su fecha de lesión, es posible que aún tenga derecho a SJDB si el trabajo no dura 12 meses o su incapacidad le impide realizar las tareas exigidas por el trabajo. Si tiene alguna inquietud, hable con su empleador o el administrador de reclamos. Si eso no ayuda, hable con un oficial de I&A estatal.

10. P. ¿Cómo califico para SJDB?

R. Si usted se lesionó en o después del 1 de enero, 2004, y está permanentemente incapacitado de hacer su trabajo habitual, y si su empleador no le ofrece otro trabajo, usted puede calificar para el SJDB. Este beneficio entra en forma de un vale que ayuda a pagar por capacitación profesional o el mejoramiento de habilidades- o ambas cosas- en escuelas aprobadas o acreditadas por el estado.

Para fechas de lesiones en o después del 1 de enero, 2004 y antes del 1 de enero, 2013, los empleados que no regresan a trabajar para su empleador dentro de 60 días después del final de pagos de TD recibirán un vale. La cantidad del vale está basada en el porcentaje de incapacidad:

  • Un vale de hasta $4,000 por una incapacidad permanente parcial de menos de 15 por ciento
  • Un vale de hasta $6,000 por una incapacidad permanente parcial entre 15 y 25 por ciento
  • Un vale de hasta $8,000 por una incapacidad permanente parcial entre 26 y 49 por ciento
  • Un vale de hasta $10,000 por una incapacidad permanente parcial entre 50 y 99 por ciento

Hasta el 10 por ciento de los fondos del vale pueden utilizarse para servicios de orientación profesional o asesoramiento para regresar a trabajar.

La ley también dice que un empleador no será responsable de proporcionar el SJDB a un empleado si, dentro de los 30 días después del final de pagos de TD, se hace una oferta de trabajo modificado o alternativo, y el empleado rechaza o no acepta la oferta en la forma y manera prescrita por el director administrativo de la DWC.

Para lesiones que ocurren en o después del 1 de enero, 2013, la cantidad del vale es de $6,000.00, independientemente de la clasificación de PD. El vale se deberá 60 días después de que un médico tratante, un QME o un AME declare al empleado permanente y estable y emita un informe describiendo las capacidades para trabajar del empleado si el empleador no le ofrece un trabajo al empleado. El trabajo debe pagar no menos de 85% de las ganancias del empleado en el momento de la lesión y debe esperarse que dure por lo menos 12 meses.

11. P. ¿Qué si mi empleador ofrece un trabajo modificado o alternativo y no lo acepto? ¿Todavía puedo recibir el vale?

R. No. Para lesiones ocurriendo entre el 1 de enero, 2004 y el 31 de diciembre, 2012, si el empleador envía un aviso de oferta de trabajo modificado o alternativo dentro de 30 días del último pago de incapacidad temporal (TD) y la oferta cumple con ciertos requisitos, y usted no acepta el trabajo, usted no tiene derecho al vale. La oferta de trabajo modificado o alternativo debe cumplir con las siguientes condiciones:

  • Usted tiene la capacidad para realizar las funciones esenciales del trabajo
  • El trabajo es un puesto regular que dura por lo menos 12 meses
  • El trabajo ofrece los salarios y compensación que son por lo menos el 85 por ciento de aquellos pagados a usted en el momento de su lesión
  • El trabajo se encuentra dentro de una distancia razonable de su residencia en el momento de la lesión.

Para lesiones en o después del 1 de enero, 2013, si el empleador hace una oferta de trabajo regular, modificado o alternativo dentro de 60 días después de que el administrador de reclamos recibe el Informe del médico sobre el Regreso al Trabajo y Vale y la oferta cumple con ciertos requisitos y usted no acepta el trabajo, usted no tiene derecho al vale. La oferta de trabajo modificado o alternativo debe cumplir con las siguientes condiciones:

  • Usted tiene la capacidad para realizar las funciones esenciales del trabajo
  • El trabajo es un puesto regular que dura por lo menos 12 meses
  • El trabajo ofrece los salarios y compensación que son por lo menos el 85 por ciento de aquellos pagados a usted en el momento de su lesión
  • El trabajo se encuentra dentro de una distancia razonable de su residencia en el momento de la lesión

Las ofertas de trabajo no deben presentarse en la DWC.

12. P. ¿Cuándo recibiré el vale de SJDB?

R. Para lesiones que ocurren entre el 1 de enero, 2004 y el 31 de diciembre, 2012, si usted tiene derecho al vale y no ha finalizado su elegibilidad (como parte de un acuerdo global en su caso) recibirá el vale del administrador de reclamos dentro de 25 días naturales de la fecha en que el juez de compensación de trabajadores en la Junta de Apelaciones emita la adjudicación de su incapacidad. Para lesiones ocurriendo en o después del 1 de enero, 2013, el vale se debe 60 días después que un médico tratante, un AME o un QME declara al trabajador lesionado permanente y estable y emite un informe describiendo las capacidades para trabajar del trabajador, si el empleador no le ofrece un empleo al trabajador.

13. P. ¿Cuándo puedo esperar recibir los pagos especificados en el vale?

R. El administrador de reclamos debe emitir pagos de reembolso a usted o pagos directamente al VRTWC o al proveedor de capacitación dentro de 45 días calendario a partir de recibir el vale completado, los recibos y la documentación.

14. P. Estoy en desacuerdo con la opinión del médico que me atiende acerca del trabajo que puedo realizar. ¿Qué puedo hacer?

R. Diferentes médicos pueden tener diferentes opiniones sobre la capacidad de un trabajador para realizar tareas de manera segura. Usted tiene derecho de cuestionar o no estar de acuerdo con un informe escrito por el médico que lo atiende. Para disputar el informe del médico acerca de su capacidad para trabajar:

  • Si usted no tiene abogado, debe enviar una carta al administrador de reclamos indicando que no está de acuerdo con el informe. Usted debe enviar la carta dentro de 30 días de recibirlo.
  • Si usted tiene abogado, póngase en contacto con su abogado inmediatamente. La fecha límite para indicar su desacuerdo es 20 días.
  • Después, usted puede obtener una evaluación médica de otro médico. Para información sobre evaluaciones médicas, llame a la Unidad Médica de la DWC al 1-800-794-6900.

Para asistencia en conseguir una evaluación médica, comuníquese con un oficial de I&A de la DWC.

15. P. No estoy de acuerdo con mi empleador sobre el trabajo asignado o el que me ofrecen. ¿Qué puedo hacer?

R. Si su empleador le asigna o le ofrece trabajo que no cumple con las restricciones de trabajo requeridas por el médico que lo atiende, usted no tiene que aceptarlo. Póngase en contacto con un oficial de I&A de la DWC para más detalles sobre cómo proceder.

Es ilegal que un empleador discrimine contra usted porque solicitó beneficios de compensación de trabajadores o porque tiene una incapacidad relacionada con el trabajo. Esto está prohibido por la sección 132a del Código Laboral de California, la Ley federal de Americanos con Incapacidades (Americans with Disabilities Act- ADA) y la Ley de Igualdad en el Empleo y la Vivienda de California (California Fair Employment and Housing Act- FEHA)

Sin embargo, un empleador no siempre está obligado a ofrecerle un puesto de trabajo u ofrecerle un trabajo que usted puede desear. Por ejemplo, puede que no haya ningún trabajo que usted puede hacer que cumpla con las restricciones de trabajo del doctor.

16. P. ¿Qué si no tengo ninguna PD (una clasificación de cero) pero todavía no puedo regresar a trabajar?

R. No hay nada más que la DWC puede hacer por usted en ese momento, pero otros tipos de asistencia pueden estar disponibles:

  • El seguro estatal de incapacidad (State Disability Insurance- SDI) o en casos raros, el seguro de desempleo (Unemployment Insurance- UI) beneficios pagados por el Departamento del Desarrollo del Empleo (Employment Development Department- EDD)
  • Los beneficios de incapacidad del Seguro Social pagados por el gobierno de los Estados Unidos por incapacidad total
  • Los beneficios ofrecidos por los empleadores y sindicatos, como la licencia por enfermedad, seguro médico grupal, seguro por incapacidad de largo plazo (Long term disability- LTD) y planes de continuación de salario
  • Un reclamo o demanda si su lesión fue causada por alguien que no sea su empleador.

Usted también debe estar consciente que la Ley federal de Americanos con Incapacidades (Americans with Disabilities Act- ADA) prohíbe la discriminación contra las personas con impedimentos físicos o mentales que limitan sustancialmente una o más actividades de la vida, y que pueden llevar a cabo las funciones esenciales del trabajo. El empleador está obligado a proporcionar una adaptación razonable si no le impone al empleador una “dificultad indebida”.

Para información sobre la ADA, llame a la Comisión de Igualdad de Oportunidades en el Empleo al 1-800-USA-EEOC.

Además, el Departamento de Igualdad en el Empleo y la Vivienda administra la ley de Igualdad en el Empleo y la Vivienda (Fair Employment Housing Act- FEHA) que prohíbe el acoso o la discriminación en el empleo, la vivienda y servicios públicos. Para más información sobre la FEHA llame al 1-800-884-1684.

17. P. ¿Puede intercambiarse el vale por un pago en efectivo?

R. No para lesiones en o después del 1 de enero, 2013.

18. P. ¿Se vence un vale?

R. El vale no se vence si se emitió antes del 1 de enero, 2013. Si se emitió en o después del 1 de enero, 2013, el vale se vencerá dentro de dos años de ser emitido o cinco años a partir de la fecha de la lesión, lo que ocurra más tarde


Tasa de Millaje


Un trabajador lesionado tiene derecho al reembolso de gastos razonables de transporte si necesitan viajar para recibir tratamiento por una lesión laboral. Gastos razonables de transporte incluyen millaje, estacionamiento, y puentes de peaje. El millaje por viajes razonables de ida y vuelta a médicos, hospitales, terapia o farmacias se puede pagar como sigue:

Fecha ¢ or Milla Formulario de millaje
On or after 1/1/2014   $.56   Descarga
On or after 1/1/2013   $.565   Descarga
On or after 7/1/2011   $.555   Descarga
1/1/2011 - 7/1/2011   $0.51   Descarga
1/1/2010 - 12/31/2010   $0.50   Descarga
1/1/2009 - 12/31/2009   $0.55   Descarga
7/1/2008 - 12/31/2008   $0.485   Descarga
1/1/2008 - 6/30/2008   $0.505   Descarga
1/1/2007 - 12/31/2007   $0.485   Descarga
7/1/2006 - 1/1/2007   $0.445   Descarga

 

Home | ProductsAbout UsCompanies | Partners | Read Our Blog
Join Our Newsletter | Contact Us | Policy Review | Policy Changes | Claims
Payment Options | Insurance Glossary | Our Privacy Policy


           


    23120 Alicia Parkway, Suite 200
Mission Viejo, CA 92692
Ph: 877-593-COMP
Powered by Insurance Website Builder

or call us at
877-593-COMP

RSS Feed
Contact Us