Preheader
Injured Worker Employers
subheader

 


Employee Education - Medical

 

Educación al Empleado - Medica

   
 

California workers’ compensation law requires claims administrators to authorize and pay for medical care that is reasonably required to cure or relieve the effects of the injury. Under laws enacted in 2003 and 2004, this means care that follows scientifically based medical treatment guidelines. It is illegal for a physician or medical facility to bill a worker if they know the injury is or may be work related. (Medical Chapter 3)

In addition to the FAQs below, employees may call 1-800-736-7401 to hear recorded information on a variety of workers' compensation topics 24 hours a day.

Employees may call a local office of the state Division of Workers' Compensation (DWC) and speak to the Information and Assistance (I&A) Unit for help during regular business hours, or attend a free seminar for injured workers.




The Division of Workers’ Compensation (Frequently Ask Questions)

1.  Q. What kind of medical care will I receive for my injury?

A. Doctors in California's workers' compensation system are required to provide evidence-based medical treatment. That means they must choose treatments scientifically proven to cure or relieve work-related injuries and illnesses. Those treatments are laid out in a set of guidelines that provide details on which treatments are effective for certain injuries, as well as how often the treatment should be given (frequency), the extent of the treatment (intensity), and for how long (duration), among other things.

To comply with the evidence-based medical treatment requirement, the state of California has adopted a medical treatment utilization schedule (MTUS). The MTUS includes specific body regions guidelines adopted from the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine's (ACOEM) Practice Guidelines, plus guidelines for acupuncture, chronic pain and therapy after surgery. The DWC has a committee that continuously evaluates new medical evidence about treatments and incorporates that evidence into its guidelines.



2. Q. Do these guidelines apply if my case is already settled?

A. They may. Treatment guidelines are considered correct even in cases that settled before the guidelines were added to workers' compensation law in 2003. Your claims administrator may continue to pay for medical care you're accustomed to for your injury. If you have a question about whether you should still be receiving a certain kind of medical treatment and you can't work it out with your claims administrator, call your local information & assistance officer for guidance.

If your medical treatment has been denied you can request an expedited hearing before a workers' compensation administrative law judge to get the situation resolved. Contact the information & assistance officer at your local DWC district office for help.




3. Q. The claims administrator hasn't accepted or denied my claim yet, but I need medical care for my injury now. What can I do?

A. The claims administrator is required to authorize medical treatment within one working day after you file a claim form with your employer, even while your claim is being investigated. The total cost of the treatment provided while your claim is being investigated is limited to $10,000. If the claims administrator does not authorize treatment right away, speak with your supervisor, someone else in management or the claims administrator about the law requiring immediate medical treatment. Ask for treatment to be authorized now, while waiting for a decision on your claim.


4. Q. Are there limits on certain kinds of treatment?

A. Yes. If your date of injury is in 2004 or later, you are limited to a total of 24 chiropractic visits, 24 physical therapy visits, and 24 occupational therapy visits, unless the claims administrator authorizes additional visits or you have recently had surgery and need postsurgical physical medicine.

5. Q. How long can I continue to receive treatment?

A. For as long as it's medically necessary. However, some treatments are limited by law and the medical treatment you receive must be evidence-based.

The MTUS lays out treatments scientifically proven to cure or relieve work-related injuries and illnesses. It also deals with how often the treatment is given and for how long, among other things.

If the treatment your doctor wants to provide goes beyond what is recommended by the MTUS, your doctor must use other evidence to show the treatment is necessary and will be effective.

Additionally, your doctor's treatment plan may be reviewed by a third party hired by the claims administrator. This process is called utilization review (UR). All claims administrators are required by law to have a UR program. They use UR to decide whether or not to approve treatment recommended by your doctor.


6. Q. What is utilization review?

A. UR is the program claims administrators use to make sure the treatment you receive is medically necessary. All claims administrators are required by law to have a utilization review program. This program will be used to decide whether or not to approve medical treatment recommended by your doctor.

The state has rules about how UR must be conducted. If you believe the UR company reviewing your doctor's plan is not following those rules you can file a complaint with the DWC.

Find more information about utilization review in the Factsheet.


7. Q. If my doctor's request for treatment is not approved, what can I do?

A. There are specific timelines you must meet or you will lose important rights. As of July 1, 2013, medical treatment disputes for all dates of injury will be resolved by physicians through the process of independent medical review (IMR). If UR denies or modifies a treating physician's request for medical treatment because the treatment is not medically necessary, you can ask for a review of that decision through IMR.

Along with the written determination letter that denied or modified your requested treatment, you will receive an unsigned but completed IMR form and addressed envelope. If you disagree with the decision, you must sign and send this form in the envelope to start the IMR process.

Please visit the IMR FAQ for detailed information about the process itself, eligibility and deadlines, as well as a link to the IMR request form.




8. Q. What happens if I was treated and the claims administrator won't pay for it? Do I have to pay?

A. You most likely will not have to pay. This is a problem your doctor and the claims administrator need to work out.

9. Q. What is a medical provider network?

A. A medical provider network (MPN) is a group of health care providers set up by your employer's insurance company and approved by DWC's administrative director to treat workers injured on the job. Each MPN includes a mix of doctors specializing in work-related injuries and doctors with expertise in general areas of medicine. If your employer is in an MPN your workers' compensation medical needs will be taken care of by doctors in the network unless you were eligible to predesignate your personal doctor and did so before your injury happened.



10. Q. What is a health care organization?

A. A health care organization (HCO) is an organization certified by the DWC to provide managed medical care to injured workers.

11. Q. What is a primary treating physician (PTP)?

A. Your primary treating physician (PTP) is the physician with the overall responsibility for treatment of your injury or illness. Generally your employer selects the PTP you will see for the first 30 days, however, in specified conditions, you may be treated by your predesignated physician or medical group. If a physician says you still need treatment after 30 days, you may be able to switch to the physician of your choice. Different rules apply if your employer is using an HCO or a medical provider network (MPN).



12. Q. What does predesignating a personal doctor involve?

A. This is a process you can use to tell your employer you want your personal physician to treat you for a work injury. You can predesignate your personal doctor of medicine (M.D.) or doctor of osteopathy (D.O.) only if the following conditions are met:

  1. A written notice predesignating the employee's personal physician or medical group is given in writing to the employee's employer prior to the date of injury for which treatment is sought and the notice includes the physician's name and business address;
  2. The employee has healthcare coverage for non-occupational injuries or illnesses on the date of injury in a plan, policy or fund; and
  3. The employee's personal physician or medical group agrees to be predesignated prior to the dates of injury.

The DWC has a form for predesignating a personal physician on the forms page of its website.


13. Q. I would like to be treated by my personal chiropractor or acupuncturist. How does that work?

A. If your employer or your employer's insurer does not have a MPN, you may be able to change your treating physician to your personal chiropractor or acupuncturist following a work-related injury or illness. In order to be eligible to make this change, you must give your employer the name and business address of a personal chiropractor or acupuncturist in writing prior to the injury or illness. There is a form you can use called the notice of personal chiropractor or personal acupuncturist. After your claims administrator has initiated your treatment with another doctor during the first 30 day period, you may then, upon request, have your treatment transferred to your personal chiropractor or acupuncturist.

If you were injured on or after Jan. 1, 2004, a chiropractor cannot be your treating physician after 24 chiropractic visits. Once you have received 24 chiropractic visits if you still require medical treatment, you will have to select a new physician who is not a chiropractor.




14. Q. Does the 24 visit cap on chiropractic visits apply to all cases?

A. No. The 24 visit cap does not apply to injuries that occurred before Jan. 1, 2004. Also, the cap does not apply if your employer authorizes additional visits in writing. Additionally, the cap does not apply to visits for certain postsurgical physical medicine and rehabilitation services.

15. Q. What if I disagree with the MPN doctor's treatment plan?

A. If you disagree with your MPN doctor about your treatment, you can change to another physician on the MPN list. You can also ask for a 2nd and 3rd opinion from different MPN doctors. If you still disagree, you can have an IMR to resolve the dispute. See the information on your MPN provided by your employer.




16. Q. What if I disagree with the MPN doctor's opinion regarding my ability to return to work, whether I'm permanently disabled, or if I need future medical treatment?

A. If you disagree with your MPN doctor on any issues other than diagnosis or treatment, you must request a qualified medical examiner (QME).


17. Q. What if the MPN doctor's request for treatment is denied by UR or the claims administrator?

A. Along with the written determination letter that denied or modified your requested treatment, you will receive an unsigned but completed IMR form and addressed envelope. If you disagree with the decision, you must sign and send this form in the envelope to start the IMR process.

Please visit the IMR FAQ at for detailed information about the process itself, eligibility and deadlines, as well as a link to the IMR request form.

18. Q. Who decides what type of work I can do while recovering?

A. Your treating doctor is responsible for explaining in a medical report:

  • The kind of work you can and can't do while recovering
  • The changes needed in your work schedule or assignments

You, your treating doctor, your employer and your attorney (if you have one) should review your job description and discuss the changes needed in your job. For example, your employer might give you a reduced work schedule or have you spend less time on certain tasks.

If you disagree with your treating doctor, you must promptly write to the claims administrator about the disagreement or you may lose important rights.



19. Q. I don't have an attorney and I have a disagreement about what my doctor report says about my injury. What should I do?

A. You may request a medical evaluation with a physician called a qualified medical evaluator or QME:

  • If your claim is delayed or denied and you need a medical evaluation to find out if the claim is payable
  • To find out if you are permanently disabled in some way or if you'll need future medical treatment
  • If you disagree with what your treating physician says about your injury, work restrictions, or TD status. However, a QME may not comment on a request for medical treatment. If your doctor’s treatment request is denied and you disagree with the UR decision, you may request an IMR

If you are represented, your attorney and the claims administrator may agree on a doctor to examine you. To receive a list of QMEs to choose from, complete the panel request form (QME 105) and mail it to the DWC Medical Unit. Ask your treating physician to help if you don't know what kind of doctor should look at your injury.

Within 20 working days of the request, the DWC Medical Unit will send a list (also called a panel) of three QMEs to you and the insurance company. QME lists are randomly selected and do not represent your employer or the insurance company.

You have 10 days from the date the list is printed and mailed to select a QME from the list, make an appointment and tell the insurance company which doctor you picked and the date of your appointment. If you don't do this within 10 days, the insurance company will have the right to pick the doctor you'll see and make the appointment.





20. Q. What if the claims administrator has sent me a QME panel request form?

A. You might need to see a QME if the insurance company disagrees with something in your claim. In that case, the insurance company will give you the form to request a QME. When this happens, you have 10 days to request a QME list by sending the form to the DWC Medical Unit. If you don't send the form within 10 days of receiving it, the insurance company will have the right to request the QME list and select the kind of doctor you'll see.

Within 20 working days of the request, the DWC Medical Unit will send a list (also called a panel) of three QMEs to you and the insurance company. QME lists are randomly selected and do not represent your employer or the insurance company.

You have 10 days from the date the list is printed and mailed to select a QME from the list, make an appointment and tell the insurance company which doctor you picked, and the date of your appointment. If you don't do this within 10 days, the insurance company will have the right to pick the doctor you'll see and make the appointment.




21. Q. What qualifications do QMEs have?

A. The DWC Medical Unit certifies QMEs in different medical specialties. A QME must be a physician licensed to practice in California. QMEs can be medical doctors, doctors of osteopathy, chiropractors, psychologists, dentists, optometrists, podiatrists or acupuncturists.

22. Q. What's the difference between a QME and an AME?

A. If you have an attorney, your attorney and the claims administrator may agree on a doctor without using the state system for getting a QME. The doctor they agree on is called an agreed medical evaluator (AME). If they cannot agree, they must ask for a QME panel list.

23. Q. I don't get the QME process. Why do I need to see a QME?

A. You and/or the claims administrator might disagree with what the treating doctor says. There could be other disagreements over medical issues in your claim. A doctor has to address those disagreements. You might disagree over:

  • Whether or not your injury was caused by your work
  • Whether or not you may need future treatment for your injury
  • Whether or not you need to stay home from work to recover
  • A permanent disability rating.

The QME (or AME if you're represented by an attorney) report will help determine what benefits you receive.


24. Q. Is there anything I can do if I disagree with what the QME says?

A. Yes, but you have a limited amount of time to decide if you agree with the QME's report or if you need more information. When you receive the report, read it right away and decide if you think it is accurate. If not, and you have an attorney, you should talk to him or her about your options.

If you don't have an attorney, and you believe there are factual errors in the QME's report, you can request factual correction of the report by making a request within 30 days of receipt of the report.

The claims administrator may also request factual correction of the report.

Upon receipt of a request for factual correction of the report, the QME is required to file a supplemental report with the DEU and state whether factual correction is necessary to ensure accuracy of the report and, if so, whether the factual corrections change the opinions of the QME stated in the comprehensive medical report.

More information may be obtained from the I&A officer at your local DWC district office.

If you are in a union, you may be able to see an ombudsperson or mediator under the terms of your collective bargaining agreement or labor-management agreement.

Find more information about QMEs and AMEs in the Factsheet.

La ley de Compensacion Laboral de California require que los Administradores de reclamos autorizen y paguen por cuidado medico que es rasonablemente requerido para curar o aliviar los efectos de una lesion. Bajo las leyes que pasaron en el 2003 y 2004, esto significa que el cuidado que sigue cientificamente basado el las reglas de tratamiento medico. Es ilegal que un doctor o clinica medica le cobre al trabajador si saben que su lesion es o puede ser relacionada con el trabajo.

Además de las preguntas frecuentes (Frequently Asked Questions- FAQs) encontradas abajo, los empleados pueden llamar al 1-800-736-7401 para escuchar información grabada acerca de una variedad de temas de compensación de trabajadores las 24 horas del día.

Empleados pueden llamar a una oficina local de la División de Compensación de Trabajadores Estatal (Division of Workers' Compensation- DWC) y hablar con la Unidad de Información y Asistencia (Information & Assistance- I&A) para ayuda durante horas de oficina regulares o asistir a un seminario gratuito para trabajadores lesionados.

La División de Compensación de Trabajadores ( DWC ) Preguntas Más Frecuentes

1. P. ¿Qué clase de atención médica recibiré para mi lesión?

R. Los médicos en el sistema de compensación de trabajadores de California deben proporcionar tratamiento médico basado en evidencias. Eso significa que deben escoger tratamientos científicamente comprobados a curar o aliviar lesiones y enfermedades relacionadas con el trabajo. Aquellos tratamientos se presentan en una colección de pautas que proporcionan detalles sobre cuales tratamientos son eficaces para ciertas lesiones, así como qué tan seguido debe darse el tratamiento (frecuencia), el grado del tratamiento (intensidad) y por cuánto tiempo (duración), entre otras cosas.

Para cumplir con el requisito de tratamiento médico basado en evidencias, el estado de California ha adoptado un catálogo de utilización de tratamiento médico (Medical Treatment Utilization Schedule- MTUS). El MTUS incluye pautas de regiones del cuerpo específicas adoptadas de las directrices de práctica del Colegio Estadounidense de Medicina Ocupacional y Ambiental (American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine- ACOEM), más pautas para acupuntura, dolor crónico y terapia después de cirugía. La DWC tiene un comité que continuamente evalúa nueva evidencia médica sobre tratamientos e incorpora aquella evidencia en sus pautas.

2. P. ¿Aplican estas pautas si mi caso ya finalizó?

R. Puede que sí. Las pautas de tratamiento se consideran correctas hasta en casos finalizados antes de que las pautas se añadieran a la ley de compensación de trabajadores en el 2003. Su administrador de reclamos puede seguir pagando por cuidado médico que usted está acostumbrado a recibir para su lesión. Si tiene alguna pregunta sobre si usted todavía debería recibir cierta clase de tratamiento médico y no puede resolverlo con su administrador de reclamos, llame a su oficial de información y asistencia local para orientación.

Si se ha negado su tratamiento médico usted puede solicitar una audiencia agilizada con un juez de leyes administrativas de compensación de trabajadores para resolver la situación. Póngase en contacto con el oficial de información y asistencia de su oficina regional de la DWC local para asistencia.

3. P. El administrador de reclamos aún no ha aceptado ni negado mi reclamo, pero necesito atención médica para mi lesión ya. ¿Qué puedo hacer?

R. El administrador de reclamos debe autorizar tratamiento médico dentro de un día laborable después de que usted le presenta un formulario de reclamo a su empleador, aún mientras su reclamo está siendo investigado. El costo total del tratamiento provisto mientras se investiga su reclamo se limita a $10,000. Si el administrador de reclamos no autoriza tratamiento en seguida, hable con su supervisor, otra persona en la gerencia o con el administrador de reclamos sobre la exigencia legal de tratamiento médico inmediato. Pida que el tratamiento sea autorizado de inmediato, mientras espera la decisión sobre su reclamo.

4. P. ¿Hay límites en ciertas clases de tratamiento?

R. Sí. Si la fecha de su lesión es en el 2004 o más tarde, está limitado a un total de 24 consultas quiroprácticas, 24 consultas de fisioterapia y 24 consultas de terapia ocupacional, a menos que el administrador de reclamos autorice consultas adicionales o usted recientemente se operó y necesita medicina física pos-quirúrgica.

5. P. ¿Por cuánto tiempo puedo seguir recibiendo el tratamiento?

R. Mientras sea médicamente necesario. Sin embargo, algunos tratamientos son limitados por la ley y el tratamiento médico que usted recibe debe ser basado en evidencias.

El MTUS presenta tratamientos científicamente comprobados para curar o aliviar lesiones y enfermedades relacionadas con el trabajo. También trata la frecuencia del tratamiento y por cuánto tiempo, entre otras cosas.

Si el tratamiento que su doctor quiere proporcionar va más allá de lo que recomienda el MTUS, su doctor debe utilizar otra evidencia para mostrar que el tratamiento es necesario y será eficaz.

Además, el plan de tratamiento de su doctor puede ser revisado por un tercero contratado por el administrador de reclamos. Este proceso se llama revisión de utilización (Utilization Review- UR). Todos los administradores de reclamos están obligados por la ley a tener un programa de UR. Utilizan la UR para decidir si aprobar el tratamiento recomendado por su doctor.

6. P. ¿Qué es la revisión de utilización?

R. La UR es el programa que los administradores de reclamos utilizan para asegurarse que el tratamiento que usted recibe es medicamente necesario. Todos los administradores de reclamos deben por ley tener un programa de revisión de utilización. Este programa será utilizado para decidir si aprobar el tratamiento médico recomendado por su doctor.

El estado tiene reglas sobre cómo la UR debe realizarse. Si usted cree que la compañía de UR revisando el plan de su doctor no está siguiendo aquellas reglas, usted puede presentar una queja con la DWC. Encuentre más información sobre la revisión de utilización en la hoja de información.

7. P. ¿Si no se aprueba la solicitud para tratamiento de mi doctor, qué puedo hacer?

R. Hay plazos específicos que debe cumplir o perderá derechos importantes. A partir del 1 de julio 2013, las disputas de tratamiento médico para todas las fechas de lesiones serán resueltas por médicos a través del proceso de la revisión médica independiente (Independent Medical Review- IMR). Si UR niega o modifica una solicitud para tratamiento del médico que lo atiende porque no es médicamente necesario, usted puede pedir una revisión de esa decisión a través de la IMR.

Junto con la carta de determinación escrita que negó o modificó su tratamiento solicitado, usted recibirá un formulario de la IMR sin firma pero rellenado y un sobre dirigido. Si usted no está de acuerdo con la decisión, debe firmar y enviar este formulario en el sobre para comenzar el proceso de la IMR.

Por favor visite las preguntas frecuentes de IMR en /dwc/IMR/IMR_FAQs.htm para información detallada sobre el proceso mismo, la elegibilidad y las fechas límites, así como un enlace al formulario de solicitud de la IMR.

8. P. ¿Qué pasa si recibí tratamiento y el administrador de reclamos no lo pagará? ¿Tengo que pagar?

R. Usted probablemente no tendrá que pagar. Este es un problema que su doctor y el administrador de reclamos tienen que resolver.

9. P. ¿Qué es una red de proveedores médicos?

R. Una red de proveedores médicos (Medical Provider Network- MPN) es un grupo de proveedores de servicios médicos establecidos por la compañía de seguros de su empleador y aprobado por el director administrativo de la DWC para proporcionar tratamiento a trabajadores lesionados en el trabajo. Cada MPN incluye una mezcla de doctores especializados en lesiones laborales y doctores con experiencia en áreas generales de la medicina. Si su empleador está en una MPN sus necesidades médicas de compensación de trabajadores serán atendidas por un doctor en la red a menos que usted fue elegible a designar a un médico personal de antemano y lo hizo antes de lesionarse.

10. P. ¿Qué es una organización de cuidado médico?

R. Una organización de cuidado médico (Health Care Organization- HCO) es una organización certificada por la DWC para proporcionar cuidado médico administrado a trabajadores lesionados.

11. P. ¿Qué es un médico primario (Primary Treating Physician- PTP)?

R. Su médico primario (Primary Treating Physician- PTP) es el médico totalmente responsable sobre el tratamiento para su lesión o enfermedad. Generalmente su empleador selecciona el PTP que usted verá durante los primeros 30 días, sin embargo, en condiciones especificadas, usted puede ser atendido por su médico particular o grupo médico previamente designado. Si un médico dice que usted todavía necesita tratamiento después de 30 días, puede poder cambiar al médico de su elección. Diferentes reglas aplican si su empleador utiliza un HCO o una red de proveedores médicos (Medical Provider Network- MPN).

12. P. ¿Qué implica hacer una designación previa de un médico personal?

R. Este es un proceso que usted puede utilizar para decirle a su empleador que quiere que su médico personal lo atienda en caso de una lesión de trabajo. Usted puede hacer una designación previa de su doctor personal en medicina (M.D.) o doctor en osteopatía (D.O.) sólo si se cumplen las siguientes condiciones:

  • Un aviso escrito que indica la designación previa del médico personal o grupo médico del empleado se da por escrito al empleador del empleado antes de la fecha de la lesión para la cual se busca tratamiento y el aviso incluye el nombre y la dirección comercial del médico;
  • El empleado tiene cobertura médica para lesiones o enfermedades no relacionadas con el trabajo en un plan, póliza o fondo; y
  • El médico personal o grupo médico del empleado consienten en ser designados antes de la fecha de la lesión.

La DWC tiene un formulario para hacer la designación previa de su médico personal en la página de formularios en el sitio web.

13. P. Me gustaría ser atendido por mi quiropráctico o acupuntor personal. ¿Cómo funciona eso?

R. Si su empleador o la compañía de seguros de su empleador no tienen una MPN establecida, es posible que pueda cambiar su médico que lo atiende a su quiropráctico o acupuntor personal después de una lesión o enfermedad laboral. Para tener derecho a hacer este cambio, usted debe antes de la lesión o enfermedad darle por escrito a su empleador el nombre y la dirección comercial de un quiropráctico o acupuntor personal.

Hay un formulario llamado aviso de quiropráctico personal o acupuntor personal que usted puede utilizar. Después de que su administrador de reclamos haya iniciado su tratamiento con otro doctor durante el periodo inicial de 30 días, usted puede entonces, bajo petición, transferir su tratamiento a su quiropráctico o acupuntor personal.

Si usted se lesionó en o después del 1 de enero, 2004, un quiropráctico no puede ser el médico que lo atiende después de 24 consultas quiroprácticas. Una vez que haya recibido 24 consultas quiroprácticas, si aún necesita tratamiento médico, usted tendrá que escoger un nuevo médico que no sea quiropráctico.

14. P. ¿Aplica el límite de 24 consultas quiroprácticas a todos los casos?

R. No. El límite de 24 consultas quiroprácticas no aplica a lesiones que ocurrieron antes del 1 de enero, 2004. Tampoco aplica el límite si su empleador autoriza consultas adicionales por escrito. Además el límite no aplica a ciertas consultas de medicina física pos-quirúrgica y servicios de rehabilitación.

15. P. ¿Qué si no estoy de acuerdo con el plan de tratamiento del doctor de la MPN?

R. Si usted no está de acuerdo con su doctor de la MPN sobre su tratamiento, puede cambiar a otro médico en la lista de la MPN. También puede pedir una segunda o tercera opinión de diferentes médicos en la MPN. Si usted todavía no está de acuerdo, puede obtener una revisión médica independiente (Independent Medical Review- IMR) para resolver la disputa. Vea la información sobre su MPN proporcionado por su empleador.

16. P. ¿Qué si no estoy de acuerdo con la opinión del doctor de la MPN sobre mi capacidad de regresar a trabajar, si estoy permanentemente incapacitado, o si necesito futuro tratamiento médico?

R. Si usted no está de acuerdo con su doctor de la MPN en alguna cuestión que no sea el diagnóstico o el tratamiento, usted debe solicitar a un evaluador médico calificado (Qualified Medical Evaluator- QME).

17. P. ¿Qué si la UR o el administrador de reclamos niega la solicitud para tratamiento del doctor de la MPN ?

R. Junto con la carta de determinación escrita que negó o modificó su tratamiento solicitado, usted recibirá un formulario de la IMR sin firma pero rellenado y un sobre dirigido. Si usted no está de acuerdo con la decisión, debe firmar y enviar este formulario en el sobre para comenzar el proceso de la IMR. Por favor visite las preguntas frecuentes de IMR en /dwc/IMR/IMR_FAQs.htm para información detallada sobre el proceso mismo, la elegibilidad y las fechas límites, así como un enlace al formulario de solicitud de la IMR.

18. P. ¿Quién decide qué tipo de trabajo puedo hacer mientras me estoy recuperando?

R. Su doctor que lo atiende es responsable de explicar en un informe médico:

  • La clase de trabajo que usted puede o no hacer mientras se está recuperando
  • Los cambios necesarios en su horario o tareas laborales

Usted, su doctor que lo atiende, su empleador y su abogado (si tiene uno) deben revisar su descripción de trabajo y hablar sobre los cambios necesarios en su trabajo. Por ejemplo, su empleador podría darle un horario de trabajo reducido o hacerlo dedicar menos tiempo a ciertas tareas.

Si usted no está de acuerdo con el doctor que lo atiende, debe escribirle inmediatamente al administrador de reclamos acerca del desacuerdo o puede perder derechos importantes.

19. P. No tengo abogado y tengo un desacuerdo sobre lo que el informe médico dice sobre mi lesión. ¿Qué debo hacer?

R. Usted puede solicitar una evaluación con un médico llamado un evaluador médico calificado o QME:

  • Si su reclamo se demora o se niega y usted necesita una evaluación médica para determinar si el reclamo es pagadero
  • Para determinar si usted está de alguna manera permanentemente incapacitado o si necesitará futuro tratamiento médico
  • Si usted no está de acuerdo con lo que el médico que lo atiende dice sobre su lesión, restricciones de trabajo, o estado de TD. Sin embargo, un QME no puede comentar sobre una solicitud para tratamiento médico. Si se niega la solicitud para tratamiento de su doctor y usted no está de acuerdo con la decisión de la UR, puede solicitar una IMR

Si lo representa un abogado, su abogado y su administrador de reclamos pueden acordar en el médico que lo evalúe. Para recibir una lista de QMEs entre los que elegir, complete la solicitud para un panel (QME 105) y envíela a la Unidad Médica de la DWC. Pídale ayuda a su médico que lo atiende si no sabe qué clase de doctor debería ver su lesión.

Dentro de 20 días laborables de recibir la solicitud, la Unidad Médica de la DWC le enviará a usted y a la compañía de seguros una lista (también llamada panel) de tres QMEs. Las listas de QME son seleccionadas al azar y no representan a su empleador ni a la compañía de seguros.

Usted tiene 10 días de la fecha en que se imprime y se envía por correo la lista para seleccionar un QME de la lista, hacer una cita e informarle a la compañía de seguros qué doctor escogió y la fecha de su cita. Si usted no hace esto dentro de 10 días, la compañía de seguros tendrá el derecho de escoger al doctor que usted verá y hacer la cita.

20. P. ¿Qué si el administrador de reclamos me ha enviado un formulario de solicitud para un panel de QME?

R. Usted podría necesitar ver a un QME si la compañía de seguros no está de acuerdo con algo en su reclamo. En ese caso, la compañía de seguros le dará el formulario para solicitar un QME. Cuando esto sucede, usted tiene 10 días para solicitar una lista de QMEs enviando el formulario a la Unidad Médica de la DWC. Si usted no envía el formulario dentro de 10 días de recibirlo, la compañía de seguros tendrá el derecho de solicitar la lista de QMEs y seleccionar la clase de doctor que usted verá.

Dentro de 20 días laborables de recibir la solicitud, la Unidad Médica de la DWC le enviará a usted y a la compañía de seguros una lista (también llamada panel) de tres QMEs. Las listas de QMEs son seleccionadas al azar y no representan a su empleador ni a la compañía de seguros.

Usted tiene 10 días de la fecha en que se imprime y se envía por correo la lista para seleccionar un QME de la lista, hacer una cita e informarle a la compañía de seguros qué doctor escogió y la fecha de su cita. Si usted no hace esto dentro de 10 días, la compañía de seguros tendrá el derecho de escoger al doctor que usted verá y hará la cita.

21. P. ¿Qué cualificaciones profesionales tienen los QMEs?

R. La Unidad Médica de la DWC certifica a los QMEs en diferentes especialidades médicas. Un QME debe ser un médico con licencia para practicar en California. Los QMEs pueden ser doctores médicos, doctores en osteopatía, quiroprácticos, psicólogos, dentistas, optometristas, podólogos o acupuntores.

22. P. ¿Cuál es la diferencia entre un QME y un AME?

R. Si usted tiene un abogado, su abogado y el administrador de reclamos pueden acordar a usar un médico sin utilizar el sistema del estado para conseguir un QME. El médico que deciden utilizar se llama un AME. Si no pueden llegar a un acuerdo, deben solicitar una lista o panel de QMEs.

23. P. No entiendo el proceso del QME. ¿Por qué debo ver a un QME?

R. Usted y/o el administrador de reclamos podrían no estar de acuerdo con lo que indica el médico que lo atiende. Podría haber otros desacuerdos sobre cuestiones médicas en su reclamo. Un doctor debe abordar aquellos desacuerdos. Puede que no estén de acuerdo sobre:

  • Si su lesión fue causada por su trabajo
  • Si puede necesitar futuro tratamiento médico para su lesión
  • Si necesita quedarse en casa para recuperarse
  • La clasificación de incapacidad permanente

El informe del QME (o AME si lo representa un abogado) ayudará a determinar qué beneficios recibe.

24. P. ¿Hay algo que puedo hacer si no estoy de acuerdo con lo que dice el QME?

R. Sí, pero tiene tiempo limitado para decidir si está de acuerdo con el informe del QME o si necesita más información. Cuando reciba el informe, léalo en seguida y decida si piensa que está correcto. Si no lo está, y tiene un abogado, usted debe hablar con él o ella sobre sus opciones.

Si usted no tiene abogado, y piensa que hay errores factuales en el informe del QME,puede solicitar una corrección factual del informe haciendo una solicitud dentro de 30 días de recibir el informe.

El administrador de reclamos también puede solicitar una corrección factual del informe.

Al recibir la solicitud para la corrección factual del informe, el QME debe presentar un informe suplementario con la DEU e indicar si es necesaria la corrección factual para asegurar la exactitud del informe y, de ser así, si las correcciones factuales cambian las opiniones del QME declaradas en el informe médico comprensivo.

Se puede obtener más información del oficial de I&A en su oficina regional de la DWC local.

Si pertenece a una unión o a un sindicato, es posible que pueda ver a un mediador de asuntos de interés público o a un intermediario bajo los términos de su contrato colectivo o acuerdo laboral.

Encuentre más información sobre los QMEs y AMEs en la hoja de información.


 

Home | ProductsAbout UsCompanies | Partners | Read Our Blog
Join Our Newsletter | Contact Us | Policy Review | Policy Changes | Claims
Payment Options | Insurance Glossary | Our Privacy Policy


           


    23120 Alicia Parkway, Suite 200
Mission Viejo, CA 92692
Ph: 877-593-COMP
Powered by Insurance Website Builder

or call us at
877-593-COMP

RSS Feed
Contact Us